Cartier Rotonde de Replica

Cartier Rotonde Astrotourbillon Watch Hands-on

If you asked me what brand I was most impressed before I visited SIHH 2010, I think Cartier Replica Wathes will not be one of my best choices. High-end watch manufacturers typically focus on the jewellery aspects of watchmaking, rather than complex mechanical aspects. At least in the past. Part of their current and future goals is to call themselves true watchmakers. Therefore, SIHH is full of interesting and complicated watches. Of course, not all watches are so complicated, but from now on, they will focus on the high-end watch collections designed for serious collectors. My favorite in this new collection is the Rotonde de Cartier Astrotourbillon (Cartier Rotonde Astrotourbillon).

This watch is not a classic tourbillon in technology – at least not in the traditional sense, but this is the best name. The tourbillon rotates the balance on its own axis, while the Astrotourbillon moves the balance on the entire dial. It is executed every minute and acts as a second hand. This concept looks very simple. The inside of the mechanism is a pain, but the watch will pull it down. You can see the fun of watching complex features in the video. In many ways, it is more satisfying than a traditional tourbillon.

Cartier Replica manufactures the MC 9451 movement entirely inside. It is manually wound around a power reserve of about 48 hours. It’s actually very effective, with less than 200 parts. To balance a special type of tourbillon, it has a platinum counterweight (not visible). In order to have a complicated space, the case is thicker (but not too thick) and 18 mm white or pink gold 47 mm wide. On Cartier’s usual smooth and polished wrist, the large case is very beautiful.

Cartier Rotonde de Replica

The Cartier Rotonde de Replica Chronograph

We study the styling of the Cartier Rotonde de Replica Cartier Chronograph and test its in-house movement in this review from the  watchesmanager.com archives. Original photos are by OK-Photography.
At first look, $9,050, the price of the Rotonde de Cartier Chronograph, seems to be a lot to pay for a steel chronograph. But it’s only a little higher than the cost of a Zenith El Primero or an IWC Portugieser chronograph. And while we’re comparing: the El Primero is a half century old already, and the ETA 7750 that runs the comparable Portugieser chronograph is almost that old and isn’t an in-house movement. Cartier unveiled its 1904-CH MC, the caliber inside the Rotonde de Cartier Chronograph, in 2013. Unlike the El Primero, it has a stop-seconds function. And although it doesn’t have a running seconds hand, its dial looks well balanced thanks to elapsed-time counters at 3 and 9 o’clock.


The 1904-CH MC is made so that the chronograph’s central elapsed-seconds hand can also be used as a running seconds hand. The two barrels maintain a constant level of drive torque independently of the winding status of their mainsprings, which ensures rate stability and precision. Our rate measurements show that the good rate continues when the chronograph is running. The results remain more or less identical after the cheap replica watches for sale has been allowed to run for 24 hours without additional winding. If the Rotonde de Cartier Chronograph is worn regularly, it will usually have fully wound mainsprings. The rotor, which turns smoothly in a sturdy ceramic ball bearing, winds the movement in both its directions of rotation. Bidirectional winding is achieved using an alternator with an innovative pawl-click system, which accelerates the winding speed.
The stopwatch function is controlled via a column wheel with vertical coupling. You can view the column wheel by peering through the sapphire window in the caseback and then looking even more deeply into the movement through an aperture in the upper bridge. The chronograph’s functions are triggered using two elongated push-pieces. Their large size makes the stopwatch easy to operate and the column wheel ensures that all switching sequences run smoothly.


The zero-return function is blocked while the chronograph is running. Cartier achieved this by installing a linear heart lever inside the movement. The lever ensures the simultaneous return of all elapsed-time hands to their zero positions independently of the pressure exerted on the push-piece. The vertical coupling ensures that the chronograph starts and stops precisely. But despite the high technology, Cartier hasn’t ignored aesthetic finesse. In addition to Geneva waves and satin finishing, circular graining embellishes even the hidden sides of various components. The fine adjustment system for the balance is an eye-catcher, too: the C-shaped regulator with eccentric screw not only facilitates ultra-precise setting; it also underscores the brand’s identity.
Roman numerals on the dial and “Cartier” in signature type above the two subdials emphasize the brand’s identity, too. (It’s rather challenging to neatly print the brand’s name on the silver-plated and guilloché-embellished brass background.) A sunray pattern adorns the main dial, while concentric circles decorate the subdials. The minutes are counted along a railway-style circle using Arabic numerals at five-minute intervals; the hours are shown by Roman numerals and index strokes.


These details contrast with the satin-finished flange around the dial’s perimeter, where elapsed seconds are marked according to the 4-Hz rhythm of the caliber. Seconds are shown by a slim, needle-like hand, which complements the two Breguet-style hour and minutes hands. The result is a harmonious set of blued stainless-steel hands, which are easy to read by day. The blued hands match the pointed blue spinel cabochon atop the winding crown, another characteristic of Cartier watches. The crown is easy to grasp thanks to its shape and the beading around its edge. Both features enhance the sporty-elegance of the case. The large push-pieces and screw-fastened strap lugs look sporty, while elegance is seen in the conical lines of the middle part of the case, which tapers toward the back, where the sapphire window is affixed via screws. The case is water-resistant, but unfortunately only to 30 meters.
The women’s replica cartier watches has a high-quality leather strap that inserts without stops from both sides into a folding clasp that pivots on one side only. This lets the wearer customize the fit of the strap, which has a certain lightness and is comfortable to wear. It takes a bit of force to open the clasp, which responds to a strong tug on its bow, which is shaped like the “C” in the “Cartier” name.

Cartier Panthère de Replica, Cartier Replica, Cartier Rotonde de Replica

Replica Cartier Resurrects an Iconic Collection

The 1980s are making a comeback – shoulder pads, big hair, and now, the Panthère de Cartier.


Cartier: Panthère de Cartier
Originally introduced in 1984, the Panther collection was the ultimate representative of the signature Cartier motif, even though it was perhaps the least literal interpretation. It was (and is again) a volume collection, with multiple references and price points, something the market seems to call for at the moment.


The design is exactly the same as the original: square case with screws on the bezel, Roman numerals, railway track index, and a tiny Cartier Replica  logo embossed in the X digit – distinguishing it from the counterfeits. The line was discontinued in the early 2000s, and is being resurrected as a full collection in three sizes with a pavé version, a lacquer-and-gold jewelry edition, and a vintage-looking yellow-gold piece, with prices ranging from $4,000 to $140,000. Only the bracelet construction and the movements are new.
Cartier: Panthère Royale & Cartier: Panthère Joueuse


The Panther also made its annual appearance in high jewelry form at the SIHH this year, highlighted by the Royale and the Joueuse. The Panthère Royale (below) was inspired by a famous panther and sapphire brooch made by Cartier in 1949 for the Duchess of Windsor, designed in concentric circles set with diamonds surrounding a panther set with diamonds.


The panther on the Panthère Joueuse (below) is depicted with an outreached paw that follows a diamond-set ball around the dial, as if playing with it. The ball indicates the hours, and the paw, the minutes. The panther is set with 254 brilliant cut diamonds with lacquer spots and emerald eyes. It contains a new complication, the automatic Caliber 9918.
Cartier: Rotonde de Cartier Minute Repeater Mysterious Double Tourbillon


In recent years, Cartier has placed a focus on its fine watchmaking department, managed by watchmaking maestro Carole Forestier, in an endeavor to build the brand among male aficionados. Among Forestier’s innovative creations this year is the Rotonde de Cartier Minute Repeater Mysterious Double Tourbillon (below). It contains the Geneva Seal Caliber 9407 and combines Cartier’s iconic mysterious movement, combined with a minute repeater mechanism for the first time. The movement is treated with dramatic black rhodium plating. The tourbillon carriage, in addition to rotating once every 60 seconds, is lodged in a sapphire disk that completes one rotation every five minutes.


The minute repeater chimes on demand, with gongs and large hammers visible at 6 o’clock. When the repeater is activated, an inertia fly-wheel turns silently, ensuring a clear sound, free of the governor that regulates the chime. The square-profile gongs are made of hardened steel, which Cartier says creates a richer, more consistent sound, largely because with square gongs, the hammers hit a more precise surface.


The watch is a limited edition of 50 pieces. Like all “mysterious” watches, the hands are not directly linked to the movement, but are joined to two sapphire disks that turn the hands – one for the minute hand and the other for the hour. The piece was inspired by Cartier mystery clocks, invented by the company in 1912.
Cartier: Trait d’Eclat & Cartier: Papyrus


Cartier is famous for its annual prolific production of one-of-a-kind jewelry watches (20 were introduced at SIHH this week). One highlight is the Trait D’Eclat, set with 15 Mozambique rubies weighing a total of 24.93 carats, designed in a ribbon motif. The flash of fire produced by the gems is described in French as a “trait d’éclat.” It contains the manual-wound Jaeger-LeCoultre Caliber 101.


Another high-jewelry piece is the Papyrus, in 18k white gold and set with 32 cushion-shaped Zambian emeralds totaling 38.20 carats, along with onyx, triangular diamonds and brilliant-cut diamonds. It contains the manual-wound Caliber 846. The design is meant to resemble foliage, inspired by the papyrus plant motif in Cartier archival pieces. Two triangular shaped diamonds serve as “hour markers” at 12 and 6 o’clock.