Cartier Calibre de Replica, Cartier Replica, Replica Watches

Reviewing the Cartier Calibre de Replica Cartier Diver

Is Cartier‘s recently released dive watch, the Cartier Calibre de Replica Cartier Diver, more than just a pretty face? We sought to find out in this test feature from the WatchTime archives. Scroll down to read the full review, with original photos by Robert Atkinson.
Just about now, some of you are thinking “A Cartier dive watch? Great, I’ll wear it with my neoprene tux.” If something like that crossed your mind, read on, and be educated. The International Organization for Standards, or ISO, is well known to watch enthusiasts. Just about everyone knows the magic numbers -4 to +6. They are part of ISO 3159 governing mechanical wrist chronometers. ISO 1413 sets standards for shock-resistant watches, and ISO 764 covers antimagnetic watches. There’s also an ISO standard for dive watches: number 6425. We took an in-depth look at it in this article. Our test watch meets this ISO standard. Many so-called dive watches do not.


The Cartier Calibre de Cartier Diver’s Look
Dive watches are defined by their cases, so that’s where we will begin. Aesthetically, the case is clearly a member of the Calibre de Cartier family. At 10.92 mm thick in our calipers (and 11 mm officially), the Calibre Diver is slim. When designing the watch, Cartier prioritized a svelte profile. At 111 grams, it’s also light, but as we’ll see, it’s no lightweight. All its surfaces wear a fine brushed finish. A polished bevel along the outer edges of the lugs catches the light. Between the lugs, the top of the case band angles out to meet the bracelet’s end pieces. On our test watch, this angled lip covers the gap between the strap and the case. This gives the watch a finished look, and it creates the impression that the strap is attached with curved spring bars, which it is not. The lugs are steeply curved and, combined with the rubber strap, make the Calibre Diver very comfortable to wear. The screws at the end of each lug help secure the bracelet. When a strap is fitted, the screws play only an ornamental role. The oversize crown guard teams up with the bezel to make the exact replica watches wear larger than its specs indicate. The case is officially listed at 42 mm in diameter. At 43.8 mm, the bezel is larger than the case, making it easier to grip. Add the crown guard, and the diameter is just over 45 mm.


The smooth, seven-sided crown screws down, contributing to the 300-meter water-resistance rating. The crown’s polished finish and distinctive deep blue synthetic spinel give the watch a dressy demeanor. Some may feel the blue jewel is not appropriate for a dive watch, but keep in mind that a Cartier tool is going to be an elegant tool.
The solid caseback is held in place with eight small screws. As we’ll discuss below, to those in the know, the simple “diver’s watch” inscription speaks volumes. The case is topped by an eye-catching, compliment-inducing bezel. It’s black ADLC (amorphous diamond-like carbon) over steel or rose gold, depending on the model. The deep gloss gives the watch a top-quality look. The edge of the bezel is highly polished, and crenelated for improved grip. The unidirectional bezel adjusts in 30-second increments (120 clicks per rotation).


A slightly domed sapphire crystal with no nonreflective coating protects a dial finished in the Calibre de Cartier style. An oversize “XII” dominates, and does almost as much to identify the manufacturer as the brand name directly beneath it. The “California” style carries over, with Roman numerals on top and broad stick markers below. The outer portion of the dial, below the Romans, is snailed. The Roman “X” incorporates Cartier’s “secret signature” anti-counterfeiting feature: the Cartier name in microprint in the numeral’s crosspiece.


The Dial
When viewing two-digit dates in the curved aperture, it appeared to our eyes that the triangle indicator protruded slightly into the left digit, though the date remains legible. The sword-shaped hands are part of the Calibre de Cartier aesthetic, and they function quite well, though some may regard them as too dainty for a dive watch. In the dark, all three hands glow, as does the small-seconds chapter ring. The small, square dots marking the hours are also treated with Super-LumiNova, though the oversize “XII” is the sole radiant Roman. On the bezel, only the inverted triangle glows, so the other bezel markings are not visible in the dark. In our test, the Super-LumiNova glowed brightly for about one hour. After two hours, the luminous output had declined to the point that it was visible only to eyes adjusted to the dark. Though the luminous output dropped off quickly, luminous elements remained legible for more than 18 hours. If you check your watch in the middle of the night, you will be able to read it.


The Strap
The strap is soft rubber, and at 120 mm by 74 mm, it will fit over a wetsuit only if your wrists are small. The strap is 23.5 mm wide at the lugs, limiting precise-fitting aftermarket options. The pin buckle is solid and attractive. It has the same fine brushed finish as the case, with the Cartier name engraved on the frame.


The Movement
The upper, outer edge of the frame displays a fine, polished bevel. Behind the solid caseback is Cartier’s in-house automatic Caliber 1904 MC, which debuted in 2010 in the original Calibre de Cartier. This movement was designed by Cartier’s resident horological mastermind, Carole Forestier-Kasapi, and the architecture emphasizes chronometric stability. The twin, series-coupled barrels do not increase the power reserve, which is 48 hours. Rather, they smooth out the energy flow as the mainsprings wind down. Cartier claims that this design also improves movement durability, as the barrels generate less friction-inducing force. The movement runs in 27 jewels at 4 Hz, or 28,800 vph.
A bidirectional rotor mounted on ceramic bearings winds the mainsprings. The bearings need no lubrication and increase longevity. Cartier uses a V-shaped pawl in place of a standard reverser to increase winding efficiency and improve shock resistance. The rotor and automatic winding bridge are finished with Geneva stripes, while the mainplate wears perlage, or circular graining. The smooth Glucydur balance wheel, flat Nivarox balance spring, and Etachron fine adjustment system regulate the release of energy.


The Cartier Calibre de Cartier Diver’s Test Performance
Given Cartier’s goal for the twin mainspring barrels, we tested the Calibre Diver on the Witschi machine at full wind and again after 24 hours, or halfway through the power reserve. Our test watch appears to have been regulated to run consistently fast. Fully wound, the Calibre Diver averaged +7.1 seconds per day in six positions, with each position in positive territory. After 24 hours, that figure increased to +9.2 seconds. The greatest deviation of rate at full wind was 5.1 seconds (+4.8 seconds crown left and +9.9 seconds dial down). After 24 hours, that figure improved to 4.9 seconds (+7.5 seconds crown up, +12.4 seconds crown down). The Calibre Diver performed much better in real life, running +2 seconds over 24 hours on the wrist. The complete timing results appear in the Specs box. Most of our tests end at this point, but as noted, our test luxury replica watches review meets the ISO-6425 requirements, and because many dive watches do not, we’ll touch on what that means.
The Tests at Cartier


ISO 6425 sets out physical requirements for dive watches, such as water resistance to a given depth, and it defines specific tests to ensure the requirements are met. The physical requirements for mechanical, analog dive watches include a device to pre-select a period of time of up to 60 minutes (usually a rotating bezel), legibility in the dark, an indication that the watch is running (usually satisfied with a luminous seconds hand), salt-water resistance, resistance to external forces, reliability under water, resistance to magnetism (ISO 764) and shocks (ISO 1413), and resistance to thermal shocks (rapid changes in water temperature). Among the tests spelled out in ISO 6425, the most significant is the requirement that every watch must be tested to 125 percent of its rated depth. This is the so-called “overpressure” test. This “test every watch” requirement is much more demanding than that set out in ISO 2281, the standard for watches that are merely “water resistant.” That standard requires testing production samples, not every watch. If your watch meets ISO 6425, you can be sure it was tested to 125 percent of its rated depth before leaving the factory. If it does not meet ISO 6425, you may be wearing an untested watch.
We asked Cartier to outline its Calibre Diver testing procedures. It provided a summary of “some” of the tests it performs: Water resistance at rated depth: 100 percent of watches are individually tested for water resistance at 375 meters, or 125 percent of the rated depth.

Cartier Replica, Cartier Tank Replica

Three Unusual Cartier Tank Replica Watches from the Past 100 Years

If you follow any watch blogs or magazines, odds are that you are already aware that this year is the 100th anniversary of the Cartier Tank Replica. Much has been written about the six new versions of the Tank Louis Cartier that were unveiled a few months back, and for good reason: to many people, the Cartier Tank is the Platonic ideal of a dress watch. I have a personal soft spot for the iconic model as well — I fell in love with the watch’s quadrilateral design at a young age and it drove my watch obsession that continues to this day. Rather than discuss what the Tank’s centenary might mean going forward like so many others already have, I’d like to highlight three uncommon Tanks that have largely disappeared from the public eye but are some of the most unexpected watches Cartier ever produced.
The Cartier Tank á Guichet


The 1928 Cartier Tank á Guichet.
If you paid attention to the Phillips Winning Icons auction that featured Paul Newman’s record-breaking Rolex Daytona, you may have noticed something curious about Lot 31. That 1931 Cartier Tank á Guichet ended up selling for $131,250, but the real story behind the unorthodox design goes back three years earlier to 1928 when the watch was created with a jumping hour in response to a growing interest in watches with a numerical display. Unlike modern jumping hour and minute watches — think the A. Lange & Söhne Zeitwerk — the Tank á Guichet doesn’t even have a visible dial. Rather, it featured a large expanse of metal with two tiny windows (guichets) that displayed the hour and minute. Cartier released multiple versions of the watch that often featured very different placement of the windows and crowns, sometimes the crown would be at 12 or 3 o’clock and the minute opening would be at 12 or 6 o’clock. These watches are exceedingly rare and someday I’d love to see a modern interpretation of this surprisingly masculine take on the Tank.
The Cartier Tank Asymétrique


The 1938 Cartier Tank Asymétrique.
While watches that are angled to this degree are common in both auto and aviation timepieces, it’s extremely rare to see a dress watch with the feature. The idea behind the turned dial is that the watch becomes more legible if your hand is on the wheel of a car or airplane. I’m still not sure what the value is on having the watch turned to this extent during a cocktail party or dinner, but maybe it had a specific purpose in mind when it was introduced in 1936. Regardless of its functionality, it’s just a handsome timepiece that inverts the idea of a Tank on its head. The rotation of the dial ends up placing 6 and 12 o’clock in the corners, and the overall sobriety of the Asymétrique serves as a departure from the decidedly avant-garde Tank á Guichet.
The Tank Must de Cartier


The 1977 Tank Must de Cartier in Red.
You may remember this cartier tank solo replica from the late 1970’s when the Swiss timepiece industry was still in the throes of the Quartz Crisis. The Les Must de Cartier collection came at a time when popular opinion was highly critical of luxury goods. Cartier — being one of the world’s largest luxury Maisons — took this opportunity to release its first-ever line of quartz watches. They were an instant success and became recognizable around the world for having colorful lacquered dials with no numerals. The Must de Cartier helped reinvigorate the brand and introduced them to a much larger, aspirational clientele.


The 1977 Tank Must de Cartier in Black.